Mystery Energy

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More is unknown than is known.

 

What Is Dark Energy?

More is unknown than is known.

We know how much dark energy there is because we know how it affects the Universe’s expansion. Other than that, it is a complete mystery.

But it is an important mystery.

It turns out that roughly 68% of the Universe is dark energy.

Dark matter makes up about 27%.

The rest – everything on Earth, everything ever observed with all of our instruments, all normal matter – adds up to less than 5% of the Universe.

Come to think of it, maybe it shouldn’t be called “normal” matter at all, since it is such a small fraction of the Universe.

By fitting a theoretical model of the composition of the Universe to the combined set of cosmological observations, scientists have come up with the composition that we described above, ~68% dark energy, ~27% dark matter, ~5% normal matter.(using some brain we came up with this story we are told in school)

What is dark matter?

We are much more certain what dark matter is not than we are what it is.

First, it is dark, meaning that it is not in the form of stars and planets that we see. Observations show that there is far too little visible matter in the Universe to make up the 27% required by the observations.

Second, it is not in the form of dark clouds of normal matter, matter made up of particles called baryons. We know this because we would be able to detect baryonic clouds by their absorption of radiation passing through them.

Third, dark matter is not antimatter, because we do not see the unique gamma rays that are produced when antimatter annihilates with matter.

Via mainstream science NASA